Tom Scully Tutorial & Diagnosis of Medicare Program

By Gregg A. Masters, MPH

washington journal scully on medicareAn excellent ‘tutorial’ of sorts on the Medicare program is provided by Tom Scully, former Bush era (2001-2004) administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, who opines on the Medicare and Medicaid Acts of 1965.

He discusses President Lyndon Bain Johnson’s vision of the bill and looks at the present state of the program including his preference for ‘means testing’, the role of Medicare Advantage and issues associated with the expansion of Medicaid via the Affordable Care Act.

Scully also fires a shot over the bow of the The National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare claim via ‘Top 10 Reasons Americans Love Medicare‘ questioning the relative ‘efficiency’ of the program compared to it’s commercial equivalents or fee-for-service (‘traditional’) Medicare.

7.  Medicare is efficient. Only 1% of traditional Medicare’s spending is overhead compared to 9% for private insurance and 6% for privatized Medicare (aka Medicare Advantage plans).

Scully notes:

Yeah, I think that’s completely and totally wrong… I’m trying not to be partisan and be objective on this. But look  Medicare is a wonderful program. It’s incredibly efficient….but basically what Medicare is it’s a single payer system where the Government pays every doctor in Toledo and every hospital the same thing. So the problem is as you have in any system – in the history of any economy in the world – when you fix prices, is volume…. so what you get is competition over volume….which is what they are incentivized to do…  

Regarding CMS, on the ‘efficiency’ claim Scully notes, perhaps in a moment of hyperbole:

I love CMS. The employees are great. They have no clue what’s going on in the healthcare system…it’s just by design that they don’t.

The video segment is courtesy of Washington Journal with original source link here. For a chronology of Medicare see: ‘Medicare Turns 48‘ courtesy of AARP.

For additional Scully insights see: ‘Care Innovation Summit: A Very Sober Assessment!

NOTE: If only Scully type rationality were native to the ‘don’t confuse me with facts’ oppositional Republican mindset of some these days, we’d be more about fixing problems than blame – just saying.

Key Steps to Successfully Implement Bundled Payment

By Gregg A. Masters, MPH

Are you tasked with ‘accountable care’ strategy, clinical integration or even business model innovation at your hospital, health system, medical group, practice or healthcare network?

Then you will be interested in this timely session on Bundled Payment.

Just consider the history (and on again off again promise) of bundling payment for healthcare services – which has a long one indeed. Recently and fueled by the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) it’s value proposition and integration upside, bundled payment has been ‘re-discovered’.Richard Gilfillan MD

When you reflect on this discontinuous ‘timeline of consideration’ (from HCFA circa 1991 to CMS in 2011) of the role of bundled payment as viable health policy reform (regardless of political ideology), I can not escape connecting the dots between strategy and people. Here and perhaps not coincidentally linked is the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation’s (CMMI) first director’s tenure and bundled payment DNA, i.e., Rick Gilfillan, MD who was/is intimately familiar with Geisinger’s ‘ProvenCare’ program – innovation in bundled payment and performance guarantees.

During an interview (see keynote here) I asked Dr. Gilfillan why so few have adopted the ProvenCare model to which he replied with some ‘angst’ –  I have no earthly clue (paraphrased).

In ‘Key Steps to Successfully Implement Bundled Payment’ courtesy of the Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute (HCI3) we are treated to a well detailed history, update and future promise of the renewed emphasis on bundling not just payment but also the underlying culture of collaboration the formula will require.

This program was recorded June 24th 2014 with Bailit Health Purchasing’s Michael Bailit and Marge Houy serving as principal faculty.

Enjoy!

 

‘Eating Glass?': A DaVita Healthcare Partners Hiccup or Impending Physician Integration Implosion?

By Gregg A. Masters, MPH

 

When Modern Healthcare somewhat ‘matter of factually’ and rather tersely reported the sudden [unexpected?] change in C-suite leadership at the DaVita acquired foray into physician global medical risk management (i.e., Healthcare Partners) of Craig Samitt, MD, I wondered what back-story this announcement might portend? samitt to leave healthcare partners

DaVita the market leader in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) care and its articulate CEO Kent Thiry has been publically outspoken about having ‘overpaid’ for Healthcare Partners and rather aggressively warranting analysts on conference calls of no more hiccups in execution, i.e., those that were responsible are no longer with us (paraphrased).

This article appeared on July 18th, 2014. Twelve days later Modern Healthcare then reported ‘DaVita again lowers earnings projections for HealthCare Partners despite Q2 improvement‘, listen here.

Samitt has been a long term and visible player in risk savvy medical group culture as a thought leader and modeller of best practices at The Dean Clinic, see:How Dean Clinic Redesigned Primary Care‘, with previous stints at Fallon Clinic,  Harvard Pilgrim Healthcare and (Atrius Health founding member) Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates. In other words his ‘street cred’ in the integrated delivery system space was/is – well – impeccable.ACO Summit

I last saw Samitt at the ACO Summit in DC 2013 where he gave an excellent presentation on how Dean was bridging that elusive volume-to-value divide via incremental though progressive blended shifts in physician compensation from production to outcomes based incentives – including the underlying though mission critical enabling cultural shifts. Brilliant I thought! Just the ticket many will need to vision and implement the broad tenets of the Affordable Care Act, especially the likes of DaVita a best in Craig Samitt ACO Summit 2013class though single specialty services provider.

So when this abrupt and (short lived tenure) departure was announced, I found myself wondering what could possibly be wrong with this marriage? It just fits too well….

We shall see as more is revealed over time. I invite any of you with inside information to share what you know. Better yet, Craig can you willingly provide any perspective here?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet Redwood Community Care Coalition: A Health Center Nested ACO

By Gregg A. Masters, MPH

Wrapped in the ‘population health’ angle but clearly a unique play in the ACO space – at least from the participation point of view of Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC), former CEO Steve Ramsland (a 10% allocated FTE) addresses the audience about their market, approach to ACOs and the deployed healthIT spine (they use cClinical Works CCMR).

More information on Redwood Community Health is available here and via 2012 Annual Report. The ACO is an interesting construction of member entities up to and including ‘a doc in private practice’.Redwood Community Care Coalition ACO HealthIT

In the article noticing the Ramsland resignation – which is interesting on it’s face in terms of back-story if any, the service area for the FQHC includes:

…health centers in Marin, Sonoma, Napa and Yolo counties, including some of the largest FQHCs such as Petaluma Health Center, Marin Community Clinics, Clinic Ole in Napa and West County Health Centers in Sonoma County, among others.

The Redwood Community Care Coalition ACO is NOT aligned with a hospital partner, it is solely sponsored by its founding members.

Atul Gawande Opines on Post ACA Agenda

By Gregg A. Masters, MPH

‘The debate about whether to provide coverage for healthcare is over…’ Atul Gawande

I had a front row seat for this one at the 5th Annual (and last) ‘Health Datapalooza‘, a label affectionately coined by the former ‘athenista’ though always energetic and singularly determined Todd Park, U.S. Chief Technology Officer and Assistant to the President. Some pretty amazing insights from this public health sensitized and Harvard trained surgeon who’s simple proscription for checklists in hospital surgical suites has no doubt served the interests of many patients who may have otherwise been subject to an unacceptable pool of recurrent adverse hospital events, see: The Checklist Manifesto’.  

‘Fear and Trembling’ or Simply ‘Lonely in’ Seattle?

By Gregg A. Masters, MPH

The old is new again…

I’ve been writing and tweeting about this theme for some time now. It was aptly offered as contextual insight via Nicole Bradberry of MZI Healthcare /Orange Solutions and CEO of the Florida Association of ACOs.

Many have similarly echoed this ‘deja vu’ theme when discussing the roll-out of ACOs including functional similarities and key differentiators with HMOs and previous managed care initiatives circa the 1980 – 2000 vintage.

One such old is new again effort is ‘direct contracting’, where the employer deals directly with the provider community without a health plan as third party intermediary. An army of TPAs (third party administrators) stepped up to offer ‘administrative services only’ (ASO) typically to larger employers who self fund their benefit plans to carve out the middleman, i.e., Aetna, United, the Blues, etc., and exercise greater flexibility with their provider community. Seeing the handwriting on the wall, many traditional insurance carriers promptly positioned themselves to compete in the TPA space via acquisition or internal accommodations.

I suppose the novelty and efficacy of direct contracting (vs. traditionally orchestrated health plan based managed care) was somewhat muted by the overall failure of the managed care industry writ large to effectively restrain the rapacious appetite of a volume fueled delivery system; see: ‘Direct Contracting: Why It Hasn’t Grown’.   

Fast forward a decade plus and we read about innovation in the Seattle market where competing health systems have internally launched ACOs and in turn are direct contracting with Boeing, see: ‘Seattle Health Systems Launch New Accountable Care Organizations for Employer’.

While the cited ‘InterStudy’ report (the think tank founded by progenitor of the ‘SuperMed’ concept and the acknowledged father of HMOs Paul Ellwood, MD) is behind a pay-wall, the report highlights are as follows [Note: for details on Boeing direct contracting see: 'Narrow Networks in Today’s Health Care Climate]:

  • Aviation giant Boeing is the first large employer in the market to sign on for both ACO networks, which will be offered to non-union members and select unionized employees. Other employers are expected to contract with the health systems prior to January 2015.
  • The UW Medicine Accountable Care Network features a mix of hospitals within the Seattle market and in surrounding communities. The network includes Seattle Children’s Hospital and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, both of which were left off the networks for most health insurance exchange policies.
  • The state’s exchange plans prominently featured narrow networks. After outcry from affected stakeholders, state Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler introduced new regulations requiring the submission of provider networks for approval, and the networks must include adequate access to specialists and community care providers. Insurers warn the regulations could lead to higher premiums, while hospitals argue that the new rule does not goes far enough to protect consumers.

Comments from report author include:

  • “The introduction of direct-contract ACOs in the Seattle market is surprising, as the market has only begun fully embracing ACOs in the last year. Traditionally, Seattle health systems have shied away from bearing risk, so the market is now entering into a more advanced model of care. Franciscan Health, which was not included in a direct-contract ACO network, may feel pressure to form one to remain competitive in the market.”
  • “Boeing’s willingness to offer the new ACOs, as well as its traditional health plans, allows employees to select the coverage and network they prefer. UW Medicine may have a bigger draw as its ACO network includes providers that have been excluded from insurance networks.”

Meanwhile, per ‘Employer Direct Contracting‘ via Knowledge Source:

According to a recent National Business Group on Health survey, 11% of the large employers are using direct contracting with designated surgical centers of excellence or patient-centered medical homes. Such direct contracting is likely to increase because another roughly 20% of such employers are considering such provider agreements.

Large employers are using reference pricing, where self-insured companies offer to pay only the median price in certain geographic areas for some medical services and require employees to pay the difference at more expensive providers.

So yes, the old is new again. The question is: will it or can it be different this time? Or will we witness another round of ‘me too’ cookie cutter strategies followed by a risk push-back bloodbath, and ‘return to core operations’ by health systems who can’t manage risk, or the acquired physician practices they are so busy swallowing or health plans who can’t manage delivery systems.

Perhaps more on point with the headline of the post is: Will the health plan and institutional health system communities and their advocacy partners respond in kind to another Søren Kierkegaard ‘fear and trembling’ moment with wisdom and clarity? Or will the collective industry ignore the lessons learned from prior well intended but misguided strategic initiative?  

Times have indeed changed, and the horse is out of the barn. Healthcare reform and its required re-engineering is no longer contained behind the closed doors of board rooms of health systems or health plans. Achieving the triple aim is a ‘all hands on deck’ responsibility of all stakeholders in the healthcare ecosystem. But people are people, so we shall see!

 

Catching Up with Farzad Mostashari, MD: An Aledade Preview at HiMSS 2014?

By Gregg A. Masters, MPH

The HealthInnovation Media footprint was again on the ground at Health Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2014 in Orlando, Florida. One of the privileges I enjoy as producer and creator of all digital content generated is I get to tag interesting people to put in front of the camera including suitable hosts for each interview segment.

In this shoot we meet with former Director of the Office of the National Coordinator for HealthIT and now Founder and CEO of ACO management company Aledade, Farzad Mostashari, MD.

The interview was masterfully handled by industry veteran and colleague Neil Versel.

Enjoy!