Posted in Accountable Care, health innovation challenges, HealthIT, population health

On the ‘N of 1’ As a Standard for ‘Accountable Care’

by Gregg A. Masters, MPH

When I penned the post, ‘CTE on the Accountable Care Agenda? Junior Seau it’s latest victim?‘ in 2012 my intention was to draw a circle around seemingly unrelated events now finding increasing conversational gravity in the emerging ‘population health‘ zeitgeist where social determinants of health are valued as strategic grist for the mill of health systems and especially their ‘integrated‘ bretheren’s leadership.

It was also my hope that the commentary might generate some sober conversation in the healthcare social media, healthtech and healthIT social media communities. Much to my dismay, there was none.

The causes of this silo-ed, episodic, ‘we’re not concerned with life or health related events that occur beyond the walls of our cathedrals of medicine‘ sick care focus are well known and documented. Though mitigated somewhat by select provisions in the Affordable Care Act with emphasis on transitions of care, avoidance of 30 day re-admissions and continuum of care coordination particularly in the long term, post acute care (LTPAC) space, it’s mostly ‘modified” business as usual in U.S. Healthcare operations.

Oft referred to as the ‘burning [fee for services] platform‘ now clearly in the crosshairs of regulators, health industry leadership, payors, employers and even patients as the source of the problem, everyone is now focused on ‘value based healthcare‘ as the ecosystem’s likely successor footprint.

Yet, we do have a long way to go.

Case in Point

As someone who’s been in the belly of the beast of the ‘healthcare borg’ dating back to the mid 70s, I have witnessed and been to more or less degrees both a strategist (‘disruptor’) and implementation principal to successor waves of ‘innovation’ – ALL intended to tame the rapacious appetite of our ‘do more to earn more‘ healthcare financing and delivery ecosystem.

Decades later the bottomline is we’ve failed, writ large and collectively as an industry. The healthcare spend run rate as a percentage of GDP (then 8%) is now approaching 18-20%., where one out of every five dollars spent in the U.S. finds its way into the coffers of the silo-ed sick-care system we’ve collectively co-created. And while the change or re-engineering imperative was then limited and contained behind mostly closed door board rooms of health systems, health plans and large self funded employers or multiple employer trusts, today that ‘conversation’ is top of mind for our nation. Then, only corporation’s and government’s financial stability were ‘at risk’, today it’s entire nation states at peril.

So clearly something must be done. It must be bold (all inclusive), truly innovative and impactful. No mere tweaks at the margin will do and this may be the last hurrah for a public/private partnership to succeed before the Government has to intervene and solve the problem from the ‘top down’.

Enter the Triple Aim, Value Based Healthcare and the Population Health Mandate

There is non-stop discussion at meetings, conferences, webinars and expositions on the subject of a structural and scaleable pivot of ‘U.S. Healthcare Inc.’, from it’s Fee For Services (FFS) roots and incentives to a successor, sustainable version. Perhaps best framed by Don Berwick and the Institute Healthcare Improvement (IHI) as the ‘triple aim’, the charge to healthcare industry leadership is for a better experience of care, with better outcomes at lower per capita costs.

This ambitious tasking rightly shifts the focus of health system leadership from that which is customarily provided within the walls of the acute – and now subacute – delivery system operating units, to the ‘upstream‘ arguably ‘roots’ of the social determinants of health as discerned by proactive risk stratification coupled with outreach to defined populations.

Technology As Enabler?

Concurrent with the pre-occupation on value based healthcare and emerging focus on population health management, we’ve been discussing and evidencing the value of ‘mhealth’ or ‘digital health‘ apps, platforms and technologies to nest inside current clinical workflows (and beyond?) and fuel delivery of the triple aim. Yet, closing in on a decade later (the iPhone launched in 2007) there is sparse and limited evidence of the salutary benefit of digital health apps to make a dent in the aggregate quality, cost and access challenges we face as an industry.

Whether we’re in collective denial, have all drunk the ‘kool-aid’ thinking this time will be different or simply point to some evidence based believe or faith that technology can serve the greater good of the triple aim’s goals, the expectations and stakes are high – very high in fact. Much talk about contributions from AI, Big Data, Gamification, VR, the Internet of Things and even the Internet of Medical Things, all get woven into often lofty forward looking tech-speak and even policy solutions of how we’re going to make this happen. Yet is this warranted?

A Long Way to Go

A recent experience of mine suggests much work remains ahead. As indicated in the Junior Seau (RIP) post there is a grand canyon divide between the ad copy and rhetoric of population health initiatives and current healthcare operations and financing.

In November I moved to South Lake Tahoe for the ski season. I am 65, in general good health and reasonably active (I surf in San Diego) and recently qualified for Medicare and chose to enroll (i.e., assign my benefits) to a private sector alternative operating under Part C as the ‘Medicare Advantage’ (NOTE: which is a misnomer, since it isn’t Medicare but rather a private and in some markets ‘enhanced version’ when when the health plan is profitable) program organized by Kaiser Permanente in San Diego California. Kaiser Permanente (KP) is a trophy IDS (integrated delivery system) and is often and rightfully acknowledged as ‘best in class‘ in their approach to the organization, delivery and financing of healthcare services. I agree, and thus elected to enroll via their ‘Senior Health Plan‘.

KP has made enormous investments in HealthIT having adapted EPIC to serve their regions’ individual operating units. KP has also embraced technology and innovation via their Garfield Innovation Center and present with a well staffed and focused social media enterprise that seems linked to its member services group.

The Event

On Friday, I headed up to the summit at Heavenly Mountain with my girlfriend Lori. Upon exiting the Gondola and traversing up to the Ski lift to the Summit I started to feel light headed, stopped, looked up and collapsed backwards. According to Lori:

‘your eyes rolled up, your face went pale and you looked expressionless. I was alarmed.’

None-the-less, determined to get to the top for the first run of the season I elected to proceed and we entered the lift to the Summit. On the way up, we had cross winds gusting between 20-30 MPH. The temperature hovered in the low 20s to teens and the air was thin and dry.

I was wearing a ski dickey and found it difficult to speak and breath. Clearly this was not normal. Yet, we exited (9500 foot elevation) and began our decent down to Tamarack Lodge. Midway through the run I stopped, began to feel light headed and very dizzy. Gasping for air, I leaned onto my poles and then everything went dark. I collapsed again.

Lori took charge, summoned the ski patrol via a passing skier. Ski Patrol arrived, placed me on oxygen, suggested I was experiencing altitude sickness and STRONGLY recommended immediate descent to the Heavenly Center for hydration and rest (65oo foot elevation).

The Social Stream – More than What I Had for Lunch

Once the fog lifted and I began to feel better, I decided to tweet my experience in the public square and tag my health plan (KP San Diego, the Heavenly Ski Center and my Twitter ‘friends’) to alert them about my experience. For both my twitter colleagues and the Heavenly Center it was an FYI with a Ski Patrol shout out to Nathan (the EMT).

For KP San Diego it was a ‘heads-up’ as in hey, this happened to me today and ‘I think you should know.’ Now I know KP has a patient portal via MyChart and one I’ve been in and out of a few times, in addition to a ‘go to the emergency department‘ when in need advisory. Yet, we’re in the age of population health, risk assessment, prevention and ‘patient generated health data’ (PGHD) including massive investments in ‘listening’ technology for the rich streams of content posted to social networks.

Now add the fact that healthcare is a litigious and thus risk averse environment. Therefore sitting on the sidelines and at best ‘listening’ is probably less risky than realtime or ‘asynchronous’ attempts to ‘intervene’. I’m sure a bevy of corporate lawyers counsel against ill advised engagement outside the normal ‘theater of operations’. Yet, I am old enough to remember when the Darling and Nork cases began to peck away at the immunity from liability traditionally argued by many hospital administrators that ‘we’re just the doctor’s workshop’ and have no control (and by extension no liability) for their actions. Yup, that once was the standard of practice a few decades ago.

The Messaging

Here are the series of tweets posted related to this narrative.

screen-shot-2016-12-19-at-1-35-02-pm

 

screen-shot-2016-12-19-at-1-35-17-pm

screen-shot-2016-12-19-at-1-35-34-pmscreen-shot-2016-12-19-at-1-35-44-pmscreen-shot-2016-12-19-at-1-35-54-pm

The Health Plan’s Response

Several days later… and in ‘async’ fashion KP weighed in via Direct Message on Twitter. I previously tweeted about my inability to reschedule a colonoscopy from a San Diego location to the Sacramento area since I am in South Lake Tahoe for the ski season. I learned that I could NOT opt for a local option as the health plan didn’t operate that way [paraphrased]. The tweets below pertain specifically to the incident on the mountain.

9:19am
@KPMemberService
Hi, Gregg. I noticed your recent tweets and wanted to follow back up with you. If you’ve already sent your email, we have not received it. Can you please resend it? Thank you! ^Jamison

9:49am
Gregg Masters MPH @2healthguru

No point in sending log to you. After DM, spoke to my PCP. She advised I can not schedule colonoscopy in NorCal (Sacramento) w/o changing PCPs. Suggested we delay until I return to Oceanside in April. Really bad form for KP. If true, you are NOT an IDN, but a federation of providers under a common marketing banner with discrete regional accounting, but worse clinical operations. I am VERY disappointed, since I am and have been a fan of KP. I am 65. I’ve been self employed since 2000, and un-insured by choice since. My health plan is my health. If KP is committed to my health, then a simple risk profile of these facts would expedite the colonoscopy as a preventive tool. I shouldn’t have to point this out to my health plan. Then add my fainting on mountain at Heavenly (9500 foot elevation) with minimally hypoxia if not cerebral edema, AND ZERO recognition or comment from @KPsandiego who I tagged [in tweet]. I mean seriously, with the investment made in tech, how can you not leverage proactively on behalf of your members? I am shocked. If this is M-F brand listening tool only and not deployed as adjunctive to KPs clinical risk management surveillance program, you are clearly missing the boat of the PGHD wave that is sweeping the ecosystem under the banner of ‘digital health’ tools. Again, I am a KP fan and believe you need be held to a higher standard given all the accolades received via others in the industry. Please pass this concern in its entirety to both Robert Pearl and Bernard Tyson who I personally hold responsible for these systemic (x2) ‘fails’. I am blogging about this experience (including this response) as a N of 1 example of ‘accountable care’ in the new age of population health contextualized via social [i.e, lifestyles of] determinants of health plan members (including their known risk profiles). Thanks for asking. My concerns go considerably beyond the usual scope of member services, and I do hope you pass on my comments in their entirety to senior leadership. My blog comments will be posted to @ACOwatch as my N of 1 version of ‘accountable care’ to this post: acowatch.me/2012/05/02/cte… Thanks Gregg

@KPMemberService
Thank you for your detailed reply, Gregg. I will definitely make sure to pass along your experience and concerns to our senior management staff. ^Jamison

Much To Do About Nothing or Reflexive Provider vs. Patient Centric Response?

One can argue,  hey dude work within the system, i.e., call/alert KP via member services, enter a note to your PCP in the MyChart portal or head to an Urgent/Emergent Care Center – quit whining.

Yet, am I wrong to think that in an era of ubiquitous, real time and ‘asynchronous’ tech stacks afforded by major social networks where participants are ‘tagged’ as in a ‘headsUP’ fashion, need be viewed solely as a forum for posted images of cats or what’s on the menu today?

When and where do we walk the talk of the upside of digital health tools, the value of patient generated data and the big data and massive analytics engines that routinely data-mine these streams for population health insights and actionable ‘intelligence’?

So maybe this is just too much to expect even from best in class performers – the likes of KP. Maybe the residual ‘resistance ifs futile’ legacy inertia is just too powerful to overcome systemically and we’ll just have to be happy with at best tweaks at the margins.

I for one think we need to up the ante and hold both the providers and financiers accountable to this dysfunctional ecosystem we’re so often powerless to influence or change.

I am committed to make a difference. Where are  you?

 

 

 

Posted in Accountable Care, population health

Accountable Care, Population Health and the Social Determinants of Health

by Fred Goldstein, M.S.

Recently I took part in the Florida Trail Association (FTA) Annual Conference. The FTA develops, maintains, protects, and promotes a network of hiking trails throughout the state, including the unique Florida National Scenic Trail (FNST). This event celebrated the 50th Anniversary of FTA founding.

A Brief History

The National Scenic Trails were authorized under the National Trails System Act of 1968 that began with the naming of the Appalachian Trail (AT) and Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) as the first National Scenic Trails. The AT was originally founded by Benton MacKaye and completed in 1937. It’s over 2,000 miles long. Earl Shaffer was the first person to do a complete single thru-hike of the AT  in 1948. Earl was a soldier returning from World War II who said he was going to “walk off the war”.  More on this and its relevance to current day later.

fta-conference-jim-and-fred
Jim and Fred at the unveiling of the sign

The Florida National Scenic Trail another of the eleven National Scenic Trails is about 1,300 miles long and has its own originator, Jim Kern. The weekend was a well-earned celebration of Jim’s vision to establish the Florida Trail 50 years ago.  Jim is also a co-founder of the American Hiking Society, and founder of Big City Mountaineers which takes under-served urban youth through wilderness mentoring expeditions.

Jim has become a friend and I am now assisting him as a Board Member of  yet another organization he founded, Friends of the Florida Trail. Most people are not aware that the only National Scenic Trail that is complete from end to end is the Appalachian Trail.  All of the other trails have hundreds of miles of gaps which require hikers to walk along roads and highways, limits access to sections, has access that can be withdrawn at any time and trail routes are constantly changing as a result. Friends of the Florida Trail is working to find a way to complete the Florida Trail.

Hiking and Population Health

fran-mainella
Fran Mainella while working at the NPS

So how does my interest in the Florida Trail and getting outdoors relate to my work in Population Health? Well its really quite simple and in fact the guest speaker, Fran Mainella addressed it in her presentation.  Fran was the 16th Director of the National Parks Service under President George W. Bush and before that she was director of the award-winning Florida State Parks for 11 years.

As she said said and I am paraphrasing:

“At the same time that outdoor places and trails seem see to be becoming less relevant to our youth with the advent of new technologies, the internet, online gaming, Facebook, Snapchat and messaging, we have become more aware that getting outdoors, walking and hiking have incredible health benefits.”

We have both seen the link that needs to be created between the healthcare system and these outdoor locations and activities to improve the health of our country. The healthcare system and the trail associations can come together in a mutually beneficial way. It’s a golden opportunity for health plans, hospitals and other providers to promote and create health in their populations while supporting a great cause, the awareness, use and protection of these outdoor assets.

img_6072Our long distance trails provide  even more reason to be supported and this was clearly expressed in what I felt was the best presentation of the entire event. The presentation was given by two recent veterans who discussed Warrior Expeditions and Warrior Hike. As mentioned above, Earl Shaffer thru-hiked the AT after WW II to “walk off the war”. Many of the men and women returning from Afghanistan, Iraq and other places, come back suffering from PTSD and other stress related issues. Warrior Hike, working with Georgia Southern University and other sponsors provides these returning veterans with the opportunity to thru-hike many of the National Scenic Trails to “decompress from their military service and come to terms with their wartime experiences”  or as one speaker said “deal with these demons.”

This year, six veterans began a thru-hike of the the Florida Trail and five completed it. The veterans told incredible stories of their journeys on the Florida Trail and how these long distance hikes positively changed their lives’, providing them with some healing from the trauma they faced.

All of the National Scenic Trails are amazing places, not just because of their beauty, but because of their ability to impact our health, both physical and mental; they are more than just a “walk in the woods” they are about Well-being for us and future generations. We should do all we can to protect and complete them.

A Few More Conference Highlights

There are two other things I’ll mention about the conference.

Ben Montgomery author of  Grandma Gatewood’s Walk gave an engaging presentation. This book, a Pulitzer Prize Finalist is worth a buy. It’s a great story about an amazing woman Grandma Gatewood, who was the first woman and just the 6th person overall to thru-hike the AT in 1955 at 67 years of age. How she did it was unbelievable and why she did it was something we as a society must work to eradicate. Having just completed the book, there’s much more to this story, but I won’t spill the beans.

img_6070
Kara Montgomery Store Manager of the Jacksonville, FL REI with their award.

In addition to the great presentations, in attendance was  REI and Kara Montgomery.  When REI came to Florida, they located their first store in Jacksonville. Since then I have been able to meet Kara and the excellent staff, purchase many items and introduce them to the FTA. REI has become a strong supporter of the Florida Trail including providing grants in 2014 and 2015.  At this years annual conference they had a booth, provided classes on map and compass and received the Florida National Scenic Trail Volunteer Partner Group of the Year award. Congratulations to REI and Kara and thanks for all of the support you provide to the FTA and other organizations around the country.

==##==

Post originally published at Accountable Health, LLC.

Posted in Accountable Care, population health, Triple Aim

Blab the Blockchain: Healthcare Implications?

by Gregg A. Masters, MPH

blockchain blab screen grab

Yesterday, April 27th 2016 I joined twitter colleagues and principal co-moderators and my ‘go-to Blab experts James Legan, MD (@jimmie_vanagon) and Charles “Chuck” Webster, MD (@wareflo) for a ‘Blab‘ on ‘blockchain implications in the heathcare space (both delivery and finance).

Our featured expert du jour Jeff Brandt was a no-show, so we winged it with an excellent overview and introduction by Chuck. We’re all learning in this space but one of the potential applications of the emerging technology might be in the granular if not seamless adjudication of complex bundled payments.

During the session many excellent references were included in the chat box. Several resources were mentioned including Smart Contracts, the Consensus 2016 conference, Youbase, and the article posted by Dan Munro on Health Standards, titled ‘Digital health lessons from BART‘.

I have a feeling there will be major application in the healthcare financing and delivery space as we progress into scaled assumption of risk under a value based healthcare incentive structure. Watch and see if you agree with some of the points made in the discussion!

 

Posted in Accountable Care, population health, Triple Aim

ACOs and Population Health: The Value Narrative

by Gregg A. Masters, MPH

Before there was ‘accountable care’, the current full court press towards innovation – whether digital health app, platform or service delivery model, an emerging culture of transformation or the attendant pursuit of the triple aim, not to mention the most recent obsession with ‘retail as cure’ for that which ails healthcare, the best and the brightest minds (both clinical and administrative guided by thoughtful health policy wonks) convened in the grand theater of ‘managed care’ or managed competition.

The model and industry writ large (both public and private sectors), variably expressed as HMO, PPOs and derivative strains of contracting models stimulating the development of IPAs, PHOs, PPMC’s, MSOs and DPOs (direct purchasing organizations) had a run from the mid 70s until its abandonment as the official vehicle to restrain the rising cost and variable quality of healthcare in the late 90s. What followed was somewhat of a meandering decade of incremental tweaks here and there to an otherwise burning platform of fee-for-service healthcare delivery and financing.

In 2015 with healthcare costs now approaching 20% of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product and the viability of the entire U.S. Government at risk to projected costs increases and unfunded liabilities of the Medicare and Medicaid programs (estimated at $64 trillion), business as usual fee-for-service medicine is no longer an option and the many cathedrals of medicine built by ‘do more to earn more’ largesse are clearly at risk in the shifting sands of value based care.

While the ‘value’ v. volume agenda has been around for a while via risk based contracting including case rates, bundled payment and even capitation – both global and professional only versions – their penetration of mainstream medicine was relatively modest – until now. That is if you can believe the growing prevalence and penetration of risk bearing ACOs arrangements, a tapestry of bundled payment participation via Federal programs and a less transparent portfolio of privately negotiated ‘value based arrangements’.

Into this theater steps one of the trophy consulting companies with both wide (global) and deep (extensive client penetration into the health plan, provider and IDN communities) aka Accenture Health (follow via @AccentureHealth).

value based care meklausInto this developing narrative with a ‘value tutorial’ of sorts steps Gerry Meklaus, the Managing Director of Accenture North America for Clinical & Health Management Services. We speak with Gerry Wednesday at 12 Noon Pacific/3PM Eastern at Pophealth Week where my colleague and co-founder Fred Goldstein, President of Accountable Health, LLC will engage Gerry in the value conversation and the many touch points between a value framework for ACOs and population health strategies of provider organizations.

Key terms to un-bundle and digest are the ‘BIG Three’: 1) to ‘improve outcomes’ via emerging best practices, the reduction in variation and effective engagement of the patient in shared decision making, 2) the effective lowering of costs from a ‘total cost of care’ perspective (not just niche wins – if you will), and 3) the well known challenge to de-silo the many silos in the healthcare ecosystem driving fragmentation, redundancy and a less than patient centric experience.

Join us as we gain insight into the challenges and successes in the market to date!

Posted in Accountable Care, ACO, Affordable Care Act, population health

Another Milestone Marker in Favor of the ACO Model?

by Gregg A. Masters, MPH

I awoke this morning to an email from a PR rep who supports outbound news for one of the emerging ACO management companies enabling physician led participation in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) aka Aledade (@AledadeACO).

I then copy, pasted and tweeted the headline: ‘Aledade Creating New Medicare Accountable Care Organizations in Seven States.

I usually ignore ‘PRs’, yet this announcAledade newsement is material as it lends support via a growing body of evidence on the viability of the ACO model and its enabling ‘consciousness’ if not ‘sentiment shift’ in the prevailing market narrative.

While some still slam the ACA – and by proxy it’s ACO ‘workhorse’ – via relentless yet ‘diminishing returnsimpact of the ‘government takeover‘ fear mongering fueled by strategically sourced oppositional research, there is a building steady body of evidence supporting both the model and the broader context of efficacy of the competitive dynamics the ACA has unleashed on the stewards of our at risk (some say collapsing) healthcare economy.

Ergo my tweet:

Aledade news tweet

Ever since the Senate Finance Committee took up the debate and relentless series of ‘amendments‘ proffered by the ‘Rs’ trying to ‘improve‘ the proposed legislation that eventually emerged as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (I NEVER use the pejorative term ‘Obamacare’), I’ve been a voice in the narrative of trying to get the facts of competitive market dynamics into the post political conversation around reforming our complex healthcare economy.

This is no easy task as the complexity of both the political process and objective reporting of how legislation becomes law including its contextual historical narrative is addressed in ‘A Legislative History of the Affordable Care Act: How Legislative Procedure Shapes Legislative History.

A challenge recognized upfront via admittedly ‘apolitical’ or ideologically agnostic ‘law librarians’ (yeah, you know those agenda driven bullies):

“Using the health care legislation passed in 2010 as a model to show how legislative procedure shapes legislative history, this article posits that legislative procedure has changed, making the traditional model of the legislative process used by law librarians and other researchers insufficient to capture the history of modern legislation. To prove this point, it follows the process through which the health care legislation was created and describes the information resources generated. The article concludes by listing resources that will give law librarians and other researchers a grounding in modern legislative procedure and help them navigate the difficulties presented by modern lawmaking.”

Since social media was starting to pick up in 2009 – 2010 time-frame, and given the angst associated with the public’s consumption of the ACA, I started ACO Watch and latter the hashtag #healthreform to track tweets associated with ACA consideration.

None-the-less, 5 years later the disinformation campaign persists though some of the pieces of the ACA are starting to show some promise of the law’s original intent. ACOs often referred to as a flawed model, perhaps an ACO lite if you will or too little too late to make a difference, the emerging datasets (both government and private market tea leaves) are building a case that the law is working.

Tomorrow on PopHealth Week, join my colleague, co-host and co-founder Fred Goldstein as we chat with Aledade Founder and CEO Farzard Mostashari, MD. This month we’re conducting a series on Population Health and ACOs talking to leadership from each ACO type: physician led, hospital sponsored and health plan enabled.

Listen here! We’re live 12 Noon Pacific/3 PM Eastern, and on demand thereafter.

Posted in Accountable Care, ACO, population health, Triple Aim

The Transformation Continues – PopHealth Week’s Focus in July

by Fred Goldstein

The role of Primary Care Providers is changing and much of this is for the better. With the Triple Aim of improving the patient experience, improving the health of populations and reducing per capita costs; along with new payment methodologies, quality measures, organizational structures, and the like, primary care providers are being asked to to play an expanded role in the healthcare system; but what is that role and how can they ensure success?

PopHealthWeek-logo-TWTTR-sq (2)During the month of July PopHealth Week will focus on Primary Care and Population Health, interviewing primary care providers and thought leaders who have developed innovative new ways to practice. We’ll explore patient centered medical homes, capitated contracts, team based care, meeting patients needs, are the incentives in ACOs large enough to change behavior, and where these trend setters believe primary care is headed.

Join PopHealth Week for the following shows:

July 1, 12 PM ET/9 AM PT

Roy Hinman, MD, Island Doctors @Island_Doctors. To listen to the broadcast click here

Roy H. Hinman, II, M.D. is the founder of Island Doctors which employs more than 50 people within 14 offices in Florida stretching from Jacksonville to Interlachen and New Smyrna Beach. They also manage a network of 32 affiliate providers throughout these six counties and around the Orlando area. Their mission is to promote health improvement to each and every patient that walks through their doors.

The practice focuses on improving their patients’ health and participates in numerous community events and health fairs including holding Diabetes Awareness Seminars several times per year. Island Doctors want each patient to achieve optimal health status through education, meal planning, exercise, smoking cessation and cholesterol management.

Dr. Hinman opened his first family practice office in 1991 on Anastasia Island in St. Augustine, Florida.

July 8th,12 PM ET/9AM PTStanding Up the ACO

Rushika Fernandopulle, MD, Iorahealth @IoraHealth

Dr. Fernandopulle is the founder and CEO of Iora Health, an innovative primary care practice that offers Team-based care that puts the patient first, a payment system based on care, not billing codes and technology built around people, not process.

July 15th, 3 PM ET/12 Noon PT 

<Tentative not yet confirmed>

Jay Lee, MD MPH aka @FamilyDocWonk 

Dr. Lee is board certified in family medicine. After leaving Stanford University with a degree in Human Biology, Dr. Lee worked for a non-governmental organization in rural northern El Salvador providing clinical support for local physicians and organizing public health projects before returning stateside for medical school at the University of Southern California and family medicine residency training at Long Beach Memorial. Prior to re-joining MemorialCare Medical Group he worked at community health centers in southern California and Boston, where he earned a Masters in Public Health at Harvard University.

Dr. Lee was recently honored and elected to the 2016 term as President of the California Academy of Family Physicians aka @cafp_familydocs

July 22, 3 PM ET/12 Noon PT 

Paul Grundy, MD Global Director of Healthcare Transformation IBM, President PCPCC and Ambassador Healthcare Denmark

Dr. Grundy, known as the “Godfather” of the Patient Centered Medical Home is one of the leading thinkers in the transformation of Primary Care and is the Founding President of the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative (PCPCC).

==##==

Fred Goldstein is the President/CEO of Accountable Health, LLC, and the co-founder of PopHealth Week. This post originally appeared here

Posted in Accountable Care, ACO, population health

Three Days in Scottsdale: Unbundling the Triple Aim?

By Gregg A. Masters, MPH

With the simultaneous running of the 6th Annual mHealth Summit (follow #mhealth14), Population Health Alliance [PHA] Forum (follow #PHAforum) and Institute for Healthcare Improvement [IHI] (follow #IHI26Forum) I am reminded of the oft quoted Don Berwick, the then Administrator for CMS channeling from his tenure in healthcare both as a clinician and ‘truth to power’ health wonk, of the ‘all hands on deck’ and ‘full court press’ nature of the challenge before the health[care] ecosystem stakeholder ‘leaderbody’ – if you will.PHA Forum 2014 via @ACOwatch

I have chosen to express his challenge more broadly as the mandate to pursue and enable a sustainable healthcare economy, since ‘business as usual’ is no longer even a remote option placed before any credible healthcare leadership whether inside, aligned with or otherwise tethered to the healthcare ecosystem sporting either traditional provider, recipient (patient/consumer) or payor stripes.

The HealthInnovation Media team is on site (me and my co-host colleague Douglas Goldstein aka @efuturist) In Scottsdale at the PHA Forum to interview keynote speakers, session leaders and interested parties to the arguably ‘nascent’ [or minimally rebranded] population health industry.

Just what is ‘population health’ you might ask? Is it ‘Disease Management 2.0’ rebranded and extended into the lifestyle or health side of the equation? Or is it some other programmatic expression yet to be fully defined and operationalized based on local provider/payor geo-political footprints?

The PHA Forum program committee has assembled a thoughtful line-up of talented folk at the PHA Forum 2014 who will address that subject. In particular, I am looking forward to hearing the perspectives (and data) from the founding Dean of the only School of Population Health Management (follow via @JeffersonJSPH), The Jefferson School of Population Health, David Nash, MD, MBA.

For the complete program agenda, click here. You can follow the twitter stream for this event via #PHAforum.